Tag Archives: ethnicity

An App for British Asian LGB?

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allout_image_6117_full (2)Denise Lau, a Sheffield Hallam Graphic Design student is currently working on a project to increase visibility of British Asian lesbian, gay and bisexual lives.

After doing some preliminary research she’s looking at designing a concept app aimed at Asian LGB communities to share coming out experiences. There may be up to 6 stages of coming out-ness to acceptance on the app.

Denise has designed an online survey to better understand her target audience. If you’re interested and have 10 minutes, please participate. Please do forward this link to others too. The deadline to complete the survey is 9 December. Here’s a link to the survey.

British Asian LGB? Then this is for you.

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Several undergraduate Graphic Design students from Sheffield Hallam University have chosen to work on my project for one of their modules this semester. Broadly speaking their brief is to increase visibility of British Asian lesbian, gay and bisexual lives.

Two students, Marcus Fern and Josh Monteith are working together. As part of their research to gain a better understanding of the subject they have designed an online survey. It is aimed at British Asian lesbian, gay and bisexual people.

If you’re interested and have 10 minutes please participate. Please do forward this link to others too. The deadline to complete the survey is 10 December. Here’s the link for the survey.

The Love That Knows Much Shame

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I was in discussion with the Southbank Centre about the prospect of a gay and lesbian panel discussion as part of this year’s Alchemy festival. It was during the last weekend of March, after Saturday 29, upon the arrival of same sex marriage (in England and Wales) that its relevance seemed more pronounced i.e. whilst we now have same sex marriage, the irony is, most British (South) Asians still find themselves unable to come out to their parents and families.

How many of us ‘successfully’ navigate with our ethnic, racial, cultural identity and our sexual identity? What sacrifices are made to fit into either camp, be it South Asian or LGBT spaces? Can you be yourself (out) and still have a good relationship with your parents and family?

Once we’ve acknowledged the current context I’m most interested in how we get to a more progressive tomorrow… More South Asian LGBT role models, who are out in public life and the media? What are South Asian LGBT role models? What role can culture (TV, film, theatre and the media) play in supporting this? How do we create more awareness and understanding through grassroots engagement – with our families, friends, communities? How can wider society support us to that better future…?

The Love That Knows Much Shame takes place on Friday 23 May, 6pm at Southbank Centre, London and is now open for booking.

Panel members include