Tag Archives: Queer

Making Progress or Losing Ground: LGBT Asia

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Sat 23 May, 6.00pm, Southbank Centre, London

Building on the success of last year’s panel discussion event at the Alchemy festival, The Love That Knows Much Shame, the Southbank Centre was keen to explore the subject again this year. We decided on a different type of event structure: a café style set-up bite size discussion event. I’ve identified distinctive speakers with a breadth of experience and perspectives. Each contributor will present for a few minutes followed by discussions on their topic.

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Dr Abhi Shetty

Consultant Psychiatrist and gender specialist Dr Abhi Shetty will cover Hinduism and LGBT. How does Hinduism understand sexuality and gender? What are the narratives of old? Abhi was born into a Hindu family in India. He received a Catholic and Hindu education and has retained an interest in religious studies as an adult. He has an academic and personal interest in diverse expressions of religion, gender and sexuality.

Rose Neelam will look at Sexuality and Gender Identity through a British Pakistani lens, with a focus on British Pakistani women.  Exploring how Pakistani Culture has informed a generation to express and accept themselves. Rose is director of Safra Project, working on issues around gender and sexuality in Islam, supporting LBTQ Muslim women and exploring the impact of Islamophobia in Queer communities.

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Anato Chowdhury

Anato Chowdhury will explore Being Bisexual: navigating invisibility and practicality. Anato was born in Bangladesh and grew up travelling between Dhaka and other cities across Europe and Asia. Over the last few years he has been documenting his experience of bisexuality, and blogging about people’s reactions to his identity. His work has a special focus on his Muslim Bangladeshi background. Anato works as an engineer in the energy industry and is currently based in Scotland.

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Raisa Kabir

Raisa Kabir will present In/Visible Space (Queer Brown Gendered Bodies): a series of visual essays that explore interwoven links between dress and space as components in the construction and visibility of South Asian LGBTQ identity. Raisa identifies as a South Asian queer femme and is a cultural activist, artist and writer. She has written about South Asian queer dress identity and culture, queer femme of colour invisibility, as well as cultural appropriation, ethnicity, diaspora and dress.

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Bobby Tiwana

And finally, I, Bobby Tiwana will talk about Mobilising Others: creating structures to enable greater Asian LGB/T engagement, participation, representation, consumption and understanding. This is as a producer of fringe narratives and LGBT broker with various cultural, educational and community agencies.

The event will offer rich provocations to stimulate discussion in groups, drawing together a diversity of perspectives, experiences, identities and understanding.

For bookings see Southbank Centre event page. The event finishes at 7.45pm.

Would be great to see you there!

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Take part, London Pride Parade – Saturday 28 June 2014

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Designed by BlossomFreedom to… be me! Come and take part in the London Pride Parade 2014 to support Asian LGBTQ lives on Saturday 28 June. We will take part in the parade to celebrate life, to show we exist, for solidarity, to offer hope and take action.

The parade commences at 13:00 from Baker Street and ends between 15:30 – 16:30 approx at Whitehall.

Please register your interest with me here leaving your details so that I can contact you. I need to provide quite an accurate figure of Parade walkers to the organisers. I will also tell you where we need to meet beforehand from 11:30 – 12:00 so that we can group together.

Come and support your sisters and brothers. Together we will make a difference!

Bobby

Rob’s take on The Love That Knows… panel discussion

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So here we are again. It certainly feels like a while since I last wrote something for this blog and it’s a pleasure to be back. Many of you may remember me as the friendly face of Beneath the Surface which toured last September and is now in the process of being developed into a fully-fledged theatrical piece – but more about that in the coming months I’m sure…

What I’m actually here to write about is a discussion that I was lucky enough to observe at Southbank Centre as part of Alchemy festival which showcases and celebrates art and culture from South Asia. The event was called The Love That Knows Much Shame and was a panel discussion which fundamentally focused on the question “Can you be LGBTQ and South Asian or are the two mutually exclusive?” It was a chance to share experiences as well as a chance to discuss ways of creating a more progressive future.

Now I could go on for reams and reams about the panel and their various areas of expertise. Needless to say, the organiser of this event had managed to select an eclectic mix of people to talk about the issues and how they, both personally and within their organisations, are helping to forge new inroads into creating a world that is prejudice-free for members of the South Asian LGBTQ community and for the queer community generally. For the sake of being brief I will simply list them here with links to their websites. I implore you to check out the good work they are all doing and to see what you can do to help aid our fight to eradicate intolerance. The event was chaired by Razia Aziz. Panel members included Aashi Gahlot, Fiyaz Mughal, Harjit Sarang and, of course, Bobby Tiwana who organised the event and whose blog I am once again hi-jacking!

So what were the main points to come out of the discussion? For any of you who were following the event on Twitter then you may have seen some of the quotes I put up:

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GAnd a hugely popular Tweet which caused a bit of a stir:

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These Tweets might help you to get a flavour of what the event was like. Fundamentally, we were gathered there to make a statement that whether you’re Gay, Straight, White, Asian or any combination in between then you can help stamp out prejudice. I likened the event to the ACT UP meetings in New York in the ‘80s which, in their hay-day, were a hotbed of ideas for tackling the AIDS epidemic. Here we are, 30 years on, across the pond, gathering again to take action against another enemy; an older one and one that’s harder to beat – homophobia. While this event was part of Alchemy, thus technically a South Asian event, I looked around the room and saw such a mix of people that I knew this topic had struck a chord with many people from outside the South Asian community as well.

We all know what it’s like to suffer prejudice at the hands of someone who is supposed to love us; we all know what rejection and intolerance feels like. Yet for many of us in the UK, we have the freedom to live our lives how we want. Especially in the cosmopolitan city centres, identifying as LGBTQ is not something we are scared to do anymore. However, for many others, coming out as LGBTQ is still a battle where the people they are fighting are their own families and friends. There were some truly touching stories shared at this event and some truly horrifying ones too – families disowning children for years and years for the meagre “crime” of loving someone of the same sex. What I found truly heartening was the number of people, from all nationalities, who turned out to support those who still find it hard to be accepted for the people they are.

Looking at the issue from a South Asian perspective though, for many people it does seem that you can identify as LGBTQ and South Asian. There are spaces between the two terms and navigating them can be hard. We touched upon the fact that “coming out” is quite a Western concept and one that does not gel well with the many highly private families in South Asian cultures – “OK so you’re gay but keep quiet about it and don’t let the neighbours know.” Similarly, it can sometimes be quite hard to know which is the best way to go about seeking acceptance – does one do it quietly by just living their life and hoping their visibility will eventually breed acceptance, or do we stand up and politicize ourselves and fight tooth and nail for our rights? We heard from people who argued for both cases and, while no agreement was made, it opened up a debate that needs to be had. How, as a collective, are we going to fight intolerance?

Of course, the issue with these sorts of discussions is that we are only ever able to scratch the surface of the problem, let alone find solutions. Maybe if there were another event like this we could pick up from where we left off and get in deeper? I know I will certainly be on the lookout for similar talks to this one. Ultimately though, the main benefit of an event such as this is that it brings people together. After an event like The Love That Knows Much Shame people don’t feel so alone – “there are others out there who want the same things as I do.” You get a chance to network, take phone numbers, organise meetings. This event was merely the starting point for people to break into smaller groups and carry on the fight in their individual communities. “Activism starts at home” as one of our panel said – let’s hope that this wonderful event has inspired people to go and make that statement true!

Also do check out Harjit Sarang’s pioneering Equal Marriage campaign.

Robert Beck got involved with Bobby’s work after one of his very dear friends was interviewed as part of the research for ‘Beneath the Surface’. Since then he has worked as a Researcher for Bobby, Social Media Adviser, Production Assistant and Guest Blogger. The work means a lot to him and he hopes to stay involved for as long as possible. He doesn’t have a website (although he probably should). Follow him on Twitter @robertjamesbeck 

London here we come

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Flare_LLGFFFlare, the 2014 London LGBT Film festival kicked off yesterday and runs until 30 March at the British Film Institute. We’re heading down tonight and planning to watch several films over the next two days. We’re watching Veronica Videla’s Passion, Concussion, Cross My Heart and Kate Bornstein is a Queer and Pleasant Danger. And who knows, whatever else takes our fancy.

I’m also heading to the Bush Theatre to catch We Are Proud to Present… by Jackie Sibblies Drury.